Guest Blogs


This Google Earth satellite photo shows the Noble “square” where Davis’ Mill once stood. Civil War correspondence from Capt. William Piland in 1865 carried the heading “Davis’ Mill – Ozark County,” indicating that the infantry company he commanded was headquartered here at the time.
Following the outbreak of the Civil War, the Ozark County Home Guard was organized in June 1861 by order of Gen. Nathaniel Lyon. It was tasked with scouting operations along the Old Salt Road, then called the “State Road,” which ran from Springfield to Jacksonport, Arkansas. Actually, the Home...
Eighteen years has gone by so fast. It’s unreal. For the families of the 2,977 people who died when 19 men hijacked four fuel-loaded commercial airplanes on that fateful day in September, the horror of 9/11 is relived over and over again. What has happened to our nation since that terrible day? As...

John and Sarah Baldwin Barrett moved to Ozark County in the late 1800s, settling on land adjoining the homestead of Plez Duckworth and his wife, Amanda. A feud developed between the two men for reasons that have been lost to time. Their enmity led to the 1891 shootout in the Ozark County Courthouse.
Editor’s note: In its first four segments, published in the July 17, 24, 31 and Aug. 7 editions of the Times, Gainesville resident Wayne Sayles’ column, An Ozark Journey, traced the history and route of the Old Salt Road created by James McClurg before the Civil War, focusing on the rugged road’...

John and Sarah Baldwin Barrett moved to Ozark County in the late 1800s, settling on land adjoining the homestead of Plez Duckworth and his wife, Amanda. A feud developed between the two men for reasons that have been lost to time. Their enmity led to the 1891 shootout in the Ozark County Courthouse.
Editor’s note: In its first four segments, published in the July 17, 24, 31 and Aug. 7 editions of the Times, Gainesville resident Wayne Sayles’ column, An Ozark Journey, traced the history and route of the Old Salt Road created by James McClurg before the Civil War, focusing on the rugged road’s...

Wayne Sayles
Editor’s note: The four-part story of Old Salt Road that concluded in the Aug. 7 edition of the Times mentioned an 1865 communication between Capt. William J. Piland, commander of Company I of the 46th Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and his superior, Brig. Gen. J. B. Sanborn. Piland’s unit was...

Wayne Sayles
Editor’s note: The four-part story of Old Salt Road that concluded in the Aug. 7 edition of the Times mentioned an 1865 communication between Capt. William J. Piland, commander of Company I of the 46th Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and his superior, Brig. Gen. J. B. Sanborn. Piland’s unit was...

Regina Mozingo
I have always loved writing. About things. About other people’s lives. Those stories are easy for me. But the hardest thing to write about is my own life, especially the scary and sad parts. This year has been full of ups and downs for my family. But nothing was quite like the turn our lives took a...

James McClurg, who in 1842 carved the Salt Road through the Ozarks wilderness from Jacksonport, Arkansas, to Springfield, Missouri, also served as a US Congressman and later as Missouri governor. He died in 1900 and is buried in Lebanon City Cemetery, where his grave is marked by this impressive marker.
Editor’s note: This is the conclusion of Wayne Sayles’ story about the Old Salt Road, a rugged trail carved through the Ozarks by Joseph McClurg in 1842 to transport salt he had purchased in New Orleans to be sold in the market in Springfield. McClurg shipped the salt by steamboat to Jacksonport...

Regina Mozingo
I have always loved writing. About things. About other people’s lives. Those stories are easy for me. But the hardest thing to write about is my own life, especially the scary and sad parts. This year has been full of ups and downs for my family. But nothing was quite like the turn our lives took a...

James McClurg, who in 1842 carved the Salt Road through the Ozarks wilderness from Jacksonport, Arkansas, to Springfield, Missouri, also served as a US Congressman and later as Missouri governor. He died in 1900 and is buried in Lebanon City Cemetery, where his grave is marked by this impressive marker.
Editor’s note: This is the conclusion of Wayne Sayles’ story about the Old Salt Road, a rugged trail carved through the Ozarks by Joseph McClurg in 1842 to transport salt he had purchased in New Orleans to be sold in the market in Springfield. McClurg shipped the salt by steamboat to Jacksonport,...

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Ozark County Times

504 Third Steet
PO Box 188
Gainesville, MO 65655

Phone: (417) 679-4641
Fax: (417) 679-3423